Dr. Tzu-Lung Chiu

Dr. Tzu-Lung Chiu

Buddhist Studies

Fon: +49 (551) 4956 - 214
Fax: +49 (551) 4956 - 170
chiu(at)mmg.mpg.de

Tzu-Lung Chiu is a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity. In 2016 she received a Ph.D.at Ghent University, Belgium. In her dissertation, Contemporary Buddhist Nunneries in Taiwan and Mainland China: A Study of Vinaya Practices, she explored Chinese Mahāyāna nuns’ perceptions of how they interpret and practice vinaya rules in the contemporary contexts of Taiwan and Mainland China. The dissertation studies the institutional organisation of Buddhist nunneries in a Chinese and in an international context. The focus lies on the attitude of nunneries towards tradition and present-day reality, as well as on their international role based on this attitude. The main aims of the research are to better understand how original Indian Vinaya monastic rules are applied in the modern bhikkhunī sangha, and to explore how Chinese nunneries inherit traditional monastic rules to meet contemporary needs and achieve future goals.

Previously, Tzu-Lung was a Postdoctoral Fellow in Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley (2016-2017). She obtained her MA in Women’s Studies at Lancaster University, UK. Her research interests include India Vinaya rules, Chinese Buddhism, gender, Buddhist ethics, the Bodhisattva rules, the qinggui (rules of purity), Humanistic Buddhism, monastic sport activities.

Publications

Chiu, Tzu-Lung, “The Practice of Fasting after Midday in Contemporary Chinese Nunneries”, Journal of the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, 11 (2015), pp. 57-89.

Chiu, Tzu-Lung and Ann Heirman, “The Gurudharmas in Buddhist Nunneries of Mainland China”, Buddhist Studies Review [SSCI], 31(2) (2014), pp. 241-272.

Chiu, Tzu-Lung, “Rethinking the Precept of Not Taking Money in Contemporary Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese Buddhist Nunneries”, Journal of Buddhist Ethics, 21 (2014), pp. 9-56.

Heirman, Ann and Tzu-Lung Chiu, “The Gurudharmas in Taiwanese Buddhist Nunneries”, Buddhist Studies Review [SSCI], 29(2) (2012), pp. 273-300.