Dr. Patrice Ladwig

Dr. Patrice Ladwig

Sozialanthropologie

Tel.: +49 (551) 4956 - 220
Fax: +49 (551) 4956 - 170
ladwig(at)mmg.mpg.de

(Research Fellow, Robert H. N. Ho Foundation in Buddhist Studies / American Council of Learned Societies)

Patrice Ladwig studied Social Anthropology and Sociology in Germany, France and the UK, and obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2008. He worked at the University of Bristol, the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology and was visiting professor at the University of Zürich and the University of Hamburg. With a regional focus on mainland Southeast Asia (primarily Laos & Thailand), he works on the anthropology of Theravada Buddhism, death and funeral cultures, religion & communist movements, colonialism, Cold War history, and a few other things.

Publications

Edited special issue and introduction in journal

[2017] (edited special section and introduction with Nicolas Sihlé) ‘Toward an anthropology of Buddhism. Introduction. Legacies, trajectories, and comparison in the anthropology of Buddhism’, Religion and Society: Advances in Research 8: 109-128.  
Link

Journal articles, edited special issues

[2017-2018] Governing the monastic order in Laos. Pre-modern Buddhist legal traditions and their transformation under French colonialism (with Gregory Kourilsky) Buddhism, Law & Society, Vol. 3, pp. 191-243.   Link

[2018] Introduction for special issue. Mimetic Governmentality, Colonialism and the State (written and edited with Ricardo Roque), Social Analysis, Vol. 62/2, pp. 1-27.   Link

[2018] Imitations of Buddhist statecraft. The patronage of Lao Buddhism and the reconstruction of relic shrines and temples in colonial French Indochina, Social Analysis Vol. 62/2, pp. 98-125.   Link

Articles in edited volumes, encyclopedias, various

[2018] The Indianization and Localization of Textual Imaginaries. Theravada Buddhist Statecraft in Mainland Southeast Asia and Laos in the context of Civilizational Analysis. In Hann, Chris & Johann P. Arnason (eds.). Anthropology and Civilizational Analysis. Eurasian Explorations (pp. 155-192). New York: SUNY.   Link

[2017] Mimetic Theories, Representation, and ‘Savages’. Critiques of the Enlightenment and Modernity Through the Lens of Primitive Mimesis. In P. Stockhammer, & C. Forberg (Eds.), The Transformative Power of the Copy (pp. 37-66). Heidelberg University Publishing.   Link

[2017] ‘Special operation pagoda’. Buddhism, covert operations and the politics of religious subversion in Cold War Laos (1957-1960). In V. Pholsena, & V. Bouté (Eds.), Changing Lives in Laos: Society, Politics and Culture in a Post-Socialist State (pp. 81-108). Singapore University Press.   Link

[2017] Buddhism in contemporary Laos. Ruptured histories. In M. Jerryson (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Buddhism (pp. 274-295). New York: Oxford University Press.   Link