Annika Kirbis

Annika Kirbis

Cultural and Social Anthropology

Fon: +49 (551) 4956 - 247
Fax: +49 (551) 4956 - 170
kirbis(at)mmg.mpg.de

Annika Kirbis is a Doctoral Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity as part of the research group “Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities” under the direction of Dr. Jeremy F. Walton. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in International Relations and International Organization at the University of Groningen, Netherlands, and the University of Pretoria, South Africa (2013), followed by her Master’s studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna, Austria, and University of Maynooth, Ireland (2016). Her research interests include memory and heritage studies, urban studies and human geography, migration, comparative literature as well as ethnographic film and walking as an ethnographic practice.

Building upon her M.A. thesis project “Between Siege and ‘Guest Work’: Revisiting ‘Turkish memories’ in Vienna’s urban heritage”, she explores the relations between the narratives on the imperial past of the Habsburg Empire and on the migration of ‘guest workers’. Thereby, particular attention will be paid to the commemoration of the sieges of Vienna and its myriad articulation in urban heritage and Austrian literature vis--vis the absence of migrants’ memories despite their profound impact on the city. By exploring processes of self-historicising and mnemonic practices within migrant communities as well as initiatives by e.g. municipal institutions to broaden the city’s narratives, expressing the surging interest in migrants’ memories in recent years, Annika’s research elaborates on the reshaping of nostalgic and amnesic cityscapes and its negotiation in literature. Thereby, she is particularly interested in the encounters between the multiple heritages of a city’s increasingly diverse (and mobile) inhabitants and its impact on the reconceptualisation of spaces and temporalities.