Dr. Jeremy F. Walton (Research Group Leader • Forschungsgruppenleiter)

Dr. Jeremy F. Walton (Research Group Leader • Forschungsgruppenleiter)

Curriculum Vitae

Jeremy F. Walton leads the research group, “Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities,” at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Göttingen, Germany. Prior to his current position, he held research and teaching fellowships at the Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka (2015-2016), the CETREN Transregional Research Network at Georg August University of Göttingen (2013-2015), Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (2012-2013), and New York University’s Religious Studies Program (2009-2012). He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago (2009). Dr. Walton’s first major research project focused on the relationship among Muslim civil society organizations, state institutions, and secularism in contemporary Turkey; his book manuscript based on this research is under contract with Oxford University Press. Dr. Walton has published in a wide selection of scholarly journals, including American Ethnologist, Sociology of Islam, and The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology. Additionally, he was a co-editor of the volume Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency (University of Chicago Press), and has book chapters in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, Orienting Istanbul: Cultural Capital of Europe?, The Cambridge Companion to Religious Studies, and Everywhere Taksim: Sowing the Seeds for a New Turkey at Gezi. “Empires of Memory,” which Dr. Walton designed, is an interdisciplinary, multi-sited project on the cultural politics of post-imperial memory in eight former Habsburg and Ottoman cities: Vienna, Istanbul, Budapest, Sarajevo, Zagreb, Belgrade, Trieste, and Thessaloniki.

Academia.edu

Research projects


Publications

Books

2017. Muslim civil society and the politics of religious freedom in Turkey. New York: Oxford University Press. Link

Edited Volumes

2020. Sharpening the Haze: Visual Essays on Imperial History and Memory. Co-edited with Giulia Carabelli, Miloš Jovanović, and Annika Kirbis. Ubiquity Press. https://www.ubiquitypress.com/site/books/10.5334/bcd/

2019. Art and Politics in the Modern Period. Co-edited with Dragan Damjanović, Lovorka Magaš Bilandžić, and Željka Miklošević. Published by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the University of Zagreb.

Journal Articles

2020. “The Ban’s mana: post-imperial affect and public memory in Zagreb.” Cultural Studies 2020. DOI: 10.1080/09502386.2020.1780285

2019. (with Doolan, K., & Cepić, D.) Charity’s dilemmas: an ethnography of gift-giving and social class in Croatia. Journal of Organizational Ethnography, 8(1), 11-24. Link

2019. “Introduction: Religious Plurality, Interreligious Pluralism, and Spatialities of Religious Difference.” Coauthored with Neena Mahadev. Religion and Society: Advances in Research 10: 81-91. DOI: 10.3167/arrs.2019.100107

2019. Introduction: Textured historicity and the ambivalence of imperial legacies. History and Anthropology, 1-13. Link

2019.  “On Institutional Pluralization and the Political Genealogies of Post-Yugoslav Islam. Coauthored with Piro Rexhepi. Religion and Society: Advances in Research 10: 151-167. DOI: 10.3167/arrs.2019.100111

2019. Sanitizing Szigetvár: On the post-imperial fashioning of nationalist memory. History and Anthropology, 1-14. Link

2016. Architectures of interreligious tolerance: The infrastructural politics of place and space in Croatia and Turkey. New Diversities, 17(2), 103-117. Link

2016. Geographies of revival and erasure: Neo-Ottoman sites of memory in Istanbul, Thessaloniki, and Budapest. Die Welt des Islams, 56(3-4), 511-533. Link

Chapters in Edited Volumes

2020. “Already Dead? Of Tombstones, Empire, and Photography.” Chapter in Sharpening the Haze: Visual Essays on Imperial History and Memory. Co-edited with Giulia Carabelli, Miloš Jovanović, and Annika Kirbis. Ubiquity Press.

2020 “Of Images and Empires.” Coauthored with Giulia Carabelli, Miloš Jovanović, and Annika Kirbis. Introduction to Sharpening the Haze: Visual Essays on Imperial History and Memory. Co-edited with Giulia Carabelli, Miloš Jovanović, and Annika Kirbis. Ubiquity Press.

2019 “Intersections of Art and Politics.” Coauthored with Dragan Damjanović, Lovorka Magaš Bilandžić and Željka Miklošević. Introduction to Art and Politics in the Modern Period. Co-edited with Dragan Damjanović, Lovorka Magaš Bilandžić, and Željka Miklošević. Published by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the University of Zagreb.

2019. “Metrosophy: Rereading Walter Benjamin in Light of Religion After Religion.” Chapter 6 in All Religion is Inter-Religion. Engaging the Work of Steven M. Wasserstrom. Kambiz Ghanea Bassiri and Paul Robertson, eds. Bloomsbury Academic.

Miscellaneous Essays

2020. “To Steward Unruly Imperial Pasts.” TRAFO: Blog for Transregional Research. 4 March. https://trafo.hypotheses.org/23098

2020. “Space, place.” A contribution to the special project, “A Universe of Terms”. The Immanent Frame, 28 February. https://tif.ssrc.org/2020/02/28/space-place-walton/

2019. “The Civil Society Effect Revisited: On the Politics of Liberal Philanthropy Today.” Contradictions: A Journal for Critical Thought, Vol. 2 (2): 101-107.

Book Reviews

2020. Review of Angie Heo’s The political lives of saints. Christian-Muslim mediation in Egypt. Published in Social Anthropology Vol 28, No. 1 (February): 197-198

2020. Review of Girard, Polo & Scalbert-Yücel (eds.), Turkish cultural policies in a global world. Published in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 26: 434-435.

Media appearance

2019. “New Books Network: Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey.” Interview with Kristian Petersen, New Books Network. https://newbooksnetwork.com/jeremy-f-walton-muslim-civil-society-and-the-politics-ofreligious-freedom-in-turkey-oxford-up-2017/

Other

2017. On the recent past, fraught present, and tenuous future of Turkish Muslim civil society. SSRC Blog: The Immanent Frame. Link

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