Seminars & Lectures 2018

"Homo itinerans: an essay towards a global ethnography of Afghanistan"

Open Lectures Winter 2017/18
  • Date: Jan 18, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Alessandro Monsutti (Graduate Institute Geneva)
  • Alessandro Monsutti is Head of Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute Geneva. Trained as a social anthropologist, Alessandro Monsutti became a member of the faculty in 2010, after having taught at the Graduate Institute of Development Studies from 2003 to 2007. He has been Research Fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies (1999-2000) and Yale University (2008-2010), Grantee of the MacArthur Foundation (2004-2006), and Visiting Professor at the University of Vienna (2012) and Arizona State University (2014). He is also Research Associate at the Refugee Studies Centre (University of Oxford). In addition, he has worked as a consultant for several international and nongovernmental organisations such as UNHCR. Among his current research interests: the political economy of reconstruction in Afghanistan as an example of emerging forms of sovereignty and global governance; asylum seekers and refugees in Europe; migrants and non-migrants in urban neighbourhoods; the changing nature of borderlands in Europe and South Asia.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Telepathy, empire, and public memory"

Open Lectures Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Feb 15, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Pamela E. Klassen (University of Toronto)
  • Pamela Klassen is Professor in the Department for the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. She currently holds the Anneliese Maier Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation, in support of a five-year collaborative project entitled “Religion and Public Memory in Multicultural Societies,” undertaken together with Prof. Dr. Monique Scheer of the University of Tübingen. Her writings include: Blessed Events: Religion and Home Birth in America (Princeton UP, 2001) and Spirits of Protestantism: Medicine, Healing, and Liberal Christianity (University of California Press, 2011). She has two books forthcoming with the University of Chicago Press: The Story of Radio Mind: A Missionary’s Journey on Indigenous Land, and Ekklesia: Three Inquiries in Church and State, co-authored with Paul Christopher Johnson and Winnifred Fallers Sullivan.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Vanishing frontiers: the blurring of the US-Mexico border"

Open Lectures Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Mar 1, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Andrew Selee (Migration Policy Institute)
  • Andrew Selee became President of the Migration Policy Institute (MPI), a think tank focused on migration processes and policies around the world, in August 2017. MPI is headquartered in Washington, DC with offices in Brussels and New York. Previously, he served as the Executive Vice President of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC, as the Center’s Vice President, and as the founding Director of the Center’s Mexico Institute. In 2017 he was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Fellowship to finish the book Vanishing Frontiers, which will be published by PublicAffairs/Hachette in June 2018. His previous books include What Should Think Tanks Do? A Strategic Guide to Policy Impact (Stanford University Press, 2013), The Politics of Partnership: The United States and Mexico (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013, edited with Peter H. Smith), Decentralization, Democratization, and Informal Power (Penn State University Press, 2011), Mexico’s Democratic Challenges (Stanford University Press, 2010, edited with Jacqueline Peschard), and Decentralization, Democratic Governance, and Civil Society in Comparative Perspective (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003, edited with Philip Oxhorn and Joseph Tulchin). Selee holds a PhD in Policy Studies from the University of Maryland, and he taught courses from 2006 to 2016 at both Johns Hopkins University and George Washington University.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Contested understandings of concepts of racial and ethnic discrimination: a critical exploration"

Open Lectures Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Mar 8, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: John Wrench (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim)
  • John Wrench is Visiting Professor in the Centre for Diversity and Inclusion at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, and Honorary Professor at the Department of Culture and Global Studies’ Aalborg University. Until 2010 he was senior researcher at the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights in Vienna, responsible for European comparative research projects on migration. He has researched and published for many years in the area of ethnic inclusion and discrimination in the labour market, first at the University of Warwick, and later at the University of Southern Denmark. His publications include Diversity Management and Discrimination: Immigrants and Ethnic Minorities in the EU, Ashgate (2007), and Equal Opportunities and Ethnic Inequality in European Labour Markets: Discrimination, gender and policies of diversity, University of Amsterdam Press, (with Karen Kraal and Judith Roosblad), 2009.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Refugees and religion"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Spring/Summer 2018
Industrial capitalism did not merely transform the nature of production, Walter Benjamin reminds us; it made waste a source of value. But if the slag-heaps and refuse dumps of industrial production have become the locus of new economic and social forms, they are often also zones of informality and exception, abandonment and precarity—from which the institutions of law and policing have been withdrawn. [more]

"In Search for Trees and Treasures"

Lecture Series "Telling Times: Memories of Culture, Cultures of Memory"
  • Date: May 23, 2018
  • Time: 14:30 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Alice von Bieberstein (Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin)
  • Alice von Bieberstein is a social anthropologist and EURIAS-fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Germany. Her research has focused on the politics of history and citizenship in relation to minority subjectivity in Germany and Turkey. Her more recent project is on local engagements with and value extraction from the material remains of Armenian heritage in far-Eastern Turkey. Her work has appeared in various journals, including Subjectivity, Social Research, and the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"When states come out: transnational movements and the diffusion of LGBT rights in Europe"

Open Lectures Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: May 31, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Phillip M. Ayoub (Drexel University, Philadelphia)
  • Phillip M. Ayoub is Assistant Professor of Politics at Drexel University. His research bridges insights from international relations and comparative politics, engaging with literature on transnational politics, sexuality and gender, norm diffusion, and the study of social movements. He received the biennial 2013-2014 award for the best dissertation from the European Union Studies Association, as well as the 2014 Kenneth Sherrill Award for the best dissertation in the field of sexuality and politics, and the 2014 award for the best dissertation in the field of human rights from sections of the American Political Science Association. His articles have appeared in Comparative Political Studies, the European Journal of International Relations, Mobilization, the European Political Science Review, the Journal of Human Rights, and Social Movement Studies, among others.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Engineering transformations in the ‘religion-development nexus’: Islamic law, reform, and reconstruction in Aceh"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Jun 4, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Michael Feener (Oxford)
  • R. Michael Feener is the Sultan of Oman Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, and Islamic Centre Lecturer in the History Faculty at the University of Oxford. He was formerly Research Leader of the Religion and Globalisation Research Cluster at the Asia Research Institute, and Associate Professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore. He has also taught at Reed College and the University of California, Riverside, and held visiting professor positions and research fellowships at Harvard, Kyoto University, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Paris), the University of Copenhagen, The Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art (Honolulu), and the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS) in Leiden, the Netherlands. He has published extensively in the fields of Islamic studies and Southeast Asian history, as well as on post-disaster reconstruction, religion and development. His current research focuses on the archaeology and history of the Maldives.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Underneath the grand yellow imperial roofs of Martyrs’ Shrines: Taiwan’s colonial past and onwards and the political symbolisms at play"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Jun 5, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Liza Wing Man Kam (MPI-MMG)
  • Liza Wing Man Kam is Research Fellow (Architecture and Urban Studies) at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity and Assistant Professor of Urban Studies and Chinese Societies at the Department of East Asian Studies at the Georg-August University of Göttingen. She was trained as architect and later researcher in Hong Kong, Singapore, Liverpool, London, Paris and Germany. Her work on Hong Kong and Taiwan depicts the transformation of political, societal and cultural symbolisms represented by the colonial urban heritage in their unique post-colonial settings by illustrating the inter-relation between architecture, historiography, identity formation and hence civic awareness. She currently investigates colonial Shinto Shrines in the Japanese occupied Taiwan as both religious space and political symbolisms for enunciating the different powers in post-war Taiwan. Her work puts into dialogue the local memory and the grand narrated history while interpreting the meaning of colonial urban heritage and colonial legacy.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Everyone (secretly) loves Sisi/Sissi: The Charismatic Empress in Italy and beyond"

Lecture Series "Telling Times: Memories of Culture, Cultures of Memory"
  • Date: Jun 7, 2018
  • Time: 15:00 - 16:30
  • Speaker: Maura Hametz (Old Dominion University)
  • Maura Hametz is a Professor of History at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, USA, specializing in the history of Italy and the late Habsburg empire since the late nineteenth century. Her research explores the intersections of politics, culture, memory, law, religion, gender, and ethnic and national identity. She is the author of In the Name of Italy (Fordham U. Press, 2012) and Making Trieste Italian, 1918-1954 (Boydell and Brewer [Royal Historical Association new series], 2005) and co-editor of Jewish Intellectual Women in Central Europe, 1860-2000 (Mellen, 2012), and Sissi’s World:The Empress Elisabeth in Myth and Memory (Bloomsbury Press, 2018 [forthcoming July]). In addition to further work on monuments, memory and Sissi in Trieste, she is currently working on projects that explore the contours of citizenship in the northern Adriatic post-Habsburg states, Virginian (American) World War I veterans ideas on war and faith, and notions of violence, intimidation, and justice in Fascist Italy articulated in the context of the Special Tribunal for the Defense of the State.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"The transmission of Chinese civilizational techniques to Southeast Asia: networking, Daoist rites, spirit possession, and hybrid ritual forms"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Spring/Summer 2018

"Muslim Diaspora and Sanctuary cities: safe places and politics of fear"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Spring/Summer 2018
  • Date: Jun 11, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Berna Turam (Northeastern University)
  • Berna Turam, Director of International Affairs Program and Professor of Sociology at Northeastern University, is the author of Between Islam and the State: The Politics of Engagement (Stanford University Press, 2007), and Gaining Freedoms: Claiming Space in Istanbul and Berlin (Stanford University Press, 2015), and the editor of Secular State and Religious Society: Two Forces at Play in Turkey (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). She also published articles in journals including British Journal of Sociology, International Journal of Urban and Regional Studies, Nations and Nationalism, International Feminist Journal of Politics, Contemporary Islam and Journal of Democracy. She co-edited a special issue, entitled “Secular Muslims?” in Comparative Studies of South America, Africa and the Middle East. Her article, entitled “Primacy of Space in Politics: Bargaining Space, Power and Freedom in an Istanbul neighborhood,” won the best article award from the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research in 2014. As a political sociologist, Turam has an abiding interest in conducting research on state-society interaction, particularly on the interaction between ordinary Muslim people and secular states. Her last book on Istanbul and Berlin--the city with the largest and densest Turkish neighborhood outside Turkey-- reveals and analyzes the ways in which contested urban space generates democratic practices that facilitate inclusion and accommodation. By gendering political and spatial processes of inclusion and exclusion, she does intersectional analysis of religion, space and gender. Currently, she is the lead Co-PI of a comparative project on cities of refuge that explores how cities shape perception and experience of fear and safety of Muslim non-citizens. The locus of Turam’s ethnographies has extended from homeland Turkey to host lands of the Muslim, Turkish and Syrian Diaspora –specifically Almaty-Kazakhstan, Berlin-Germany Athens-Greece and North America. During her sabbatical in 2016, she was awarded two fellowships, Dahrendorf fellowship at London School of Economics and Erasmus Fellowship at Cosmopolis Department of Geography at Vrije University in Brussels.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Aging and Migration: An Insight into the German-European Context"

Max Planck Research Group “Ageing in a Time of Mobility” Lecture Series 2018
  • Date: Jun 19, 2018
  • Time: 14:30 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Helen Baykara-Krumme (MPI-MMG)
  • Helen Baykara-Krumme works at MPI-MMG in the Department of Socio-Cultural Diversity in the project ‘Civil Society Organizations and the Challenges of Migration and Diversity: Agents of Change (ZOMiDi)’. Her research focuses on the patterns and factors of change in civil society organizations in response to migration and diversity. Before joining the institute, Helen taught as an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology and in the Interdisciplinary Research Centre for Integration and Migration (InZentIM) at the University Duisburg-Essen and at Chemnitz University of Technology. Helen holds a PhD in Sociology from the Free University of Berlin and was a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School LIFE at the MPI for Human Development in Berlin. In 2017, she completed her habilitation at Chemnitz University. Her research interests so far mainly included family change and aging processes in migration and minority contexts, migrant transnationalism, integration and dissimilation processes and methodological issues in migration research.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"The emergence of Irreecha into the political scene in post-1991 Ethiopia"

African Diversities Colloquium Spring / Summer 2018

"Uncertainty, sociality and value: mediating indeterminacy in South Sudan and Kenya"

African Diversities Colloquium Spring / Summer 2018

"Morbid Fascinations: On the Textured Historicity of Zagreb’s Mirogoj Cemetery"

Lecture Series "Telling Times: Memories of Culture, Cultures of Memory"
  • Date: Jul 4, 2018
  • Time: 14:00 - 15:30
  • Speaker: Jeremy F. Walton (Max Planck Research Group Leader at MPI-MMG)
  • Jeremy F. Walton is the leader of the Max Planck Research Group, “Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities,” at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (MPI-MMG) in Göttingen, Germany. Prior to his current position, he held research and teaching fellowships at the Center for Advanced Studies of Southeastern Europe at the University of Rijeka, the CETREN Transregional Research Network at Georg August University of Göttingen, Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, and New York University’s Religious Studies Program. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2009. Dr. Walton’s first book, Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey (Oxford University Press, 2017), is an ethnographic exploration of the relationship among Muslim civil society organizations, state institutions, and secularism in contemporary Turkey. He has published his research in a wide selection of scholarly journals, including American Ethnologist, Sociology of Islam, The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, and Die Welt des Islams. “Empires of Memory,” which Dr. Walton designed, is an interdisciplinary, multi-sited project on the cultural politics of post-imperial memory and history in eight former Habsburg and Ottoman cities: Vienna, Istanbul, Budapest, Sarajevo, Trieste, Thessaloniki, Zagreb, and Belgrade. His research in the context of “Empires of Memory” examines the ambivalent legacies and modes of amnesia that emerge from specific sites of memory in each of these cities.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Elderscapes: Ageing in Urban South Asia"

Max Planck Research Group “Ageing in a Time of Mobility” Lecture Series 2018
  • Date: Jul 10, 2018
  • Time: 14:15 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Annika Mayer (Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf) and Jakob Gross
  • Jakob Gross studied cultural anthropology, psychology and religious studies. He taught at the film school Macromedia and has published an article on ‘The habitus of the documentary field’. He worked for Documentary Campus Master School and DOK.fest Munich film festival. As an associate member of the Cluster of Excellence of Heidelberg University he worked on new forms of representation in visual anthropology. Since 2008 he has been producing his own documentary films and has been working as a cinematographer. Annika Mayer studied visual anthropology, political sciences and new German literature in Munich and Paris. After her studies, she worked as scientific assistant at the Institute for Indology and Anthropology at the LMU Munich. In 2017 she completed her PhD on ageing in the Indian middle-classes at Heidelberg University. Since 2013 Annika has been working as an editor, director and producer. She is currently pursuing her Master in film editing at the Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room
A talk by Abdoumaliq Simone. Lecture is free, but space is limited. Please rsvp to aaud@mmg.mpg.de. [more]

"The matter of death: destruction and loss in Rotterdam during World War Two"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Sep 24, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Ton Robben (Utrecht University)
  • Antonius C.G.M. Robben is Professor of Anthropology at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and past President of the Netherlands Society of Anthropology. He received a Ph.D. (1986) from the University of California, Berkeley, and has been a research fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows, Ann Arbor, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and the David Rockefeller Center, Harvard University. His monographs include Political Violence and Trauma in Argentina (2005), which won the Textor Prize from the American Anthropological Association in 2006 for Excellence in Anthropology, and Argentina Betrayed: Memory, Mourning, and Accountability (2018). His most recent edited volumes are Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights (2015; co-edited with Francisco Ferrándiz), Death, Mourning, and Burial: A Cross-Cultural Reader (2017, 2nd ed.), and A Companion to the Anthropology of Death (2018).
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"The voices of good and evil: what is enlightenment?"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Sep 25, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: WANG Hui (Tsinghua University=
  • Wang Hui, Distinguished Professor of literature and history at Tsinghua University, Changjiang Scholar, Director of Tsinghua Institute for Advanced Study in Humanities and Social Sciences. He achieved his Ph.D in 1988 at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. From 1996 to 2007, he served as the co-editor of Dushu magazine and organized a series of significant intellectual debates in China. In 2002, he moved to Tsinghua University. His fields are Chinese intellectual history, modern Chinese literature and social theory etc. His publications include The Rise of Modern Chinese Thought (four volumes), The Depolitized Politics, “Tibetan Question” between East and West, From Asian Perspective: Narrations of Chinese History, The Short Twentieth Century: Chinese Revolution and the Logic of Politics tc. Many of his works have been translated into different languages including China’s New Order, The End of the Revolution, The Politics of Imagining Asia and China from Empire to Nation-State: China’s Twentieth Century etc. He is the winner of “2013 Luca Pacioli Prize” and “2018 Anneliese Maier Research Award”.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Complexities of Elder Care: Migration Patterns, Housing, and Daily Needs of Elderly People in Three West African Villages"

Max Planck Research Group “Ageing in a Time of Mobility” Lecture Series 2018
  • Date: Sep 26, 2018
  • Time: 14:30 - 16:00
  • Speaker: Tabea Häberlein (Bayreuth University)
  • Tabea Häberlein holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the Bayreuth International Graduate School for African Studies (BIGSAS), Bayreuth University. She currently works as a research associate at the Chair of Social Anthropology, University of Bayreuth in the DFG-funded research project “Inner family resource flows and intergenerational relationships in West Africa” Her main fields of interest cover intergenerational relationships, age class systems, lifecourse, age and ageing.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Beyond ‘propaganda’: images and the moral citizen in late-socialist Vietnam"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Oct 8, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Susan Bayly (Cambridge University)
  • Susan Bayly (M.A., Ph.D. University of Cambridge) is Professor of Historical Anthropology and Director of Graduate Education in the Cambridge University Department of Social Anthropology. She is a past editor of The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute and former Associate Editor of Cambridge Anthropology. She has held visiting appointments in the USA, India, France and Singapore. She is adviser to a number of museums and other institutions in Vietnam, including the Vietnam Centre for Research & Promotion of Cultural Heritage. Her publications include Asian Voices in a Postcolonial Age. Vietnam, India and Beyond (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and Caste, Society and Politics in India from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Age (Cambridge University Press, 1999). Her current research is on aspects of marketisation experience in contemporary Vietnam, though she retains a longstanding interest in the Indian subcontinent. She recently completed a study of conceptions of achievement and success in contemporary Vietnam funded by the UK ESRC, and is currently combining the perspectives of visual anthropology and the anthropology of morality and ethics in a project on how official and personal images are deployed and perceived in variety of present-day Hanoi contexts.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room
Der Vortrag beschreibt die Gründung der deutschfranzösisch-italienischen Rettungsorganisation SOS MEDITERRANEE und den Einsatz des Rettungsschiffes „Aquarius“ im zentralen Mittelmeer zwischen Libyen und Lampedusa. [more]

"Politics in the piyasa: marching, marketing, and the emergence of gay identities in Istanbul"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Oct 22, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Sam Williams (Max Planck – Cambridge Centre for Ethics, Economy, and Social Change ▪ Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
  • Samuel Williams is a Research Fellow in the Max Planck-Cambridge Centre for Ethics, Economy, and Social Change, and he is based at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle. His research examines interesections between economy and material culture in Turkey, and he has a particular interest in the ethnographic study of markets and marketplaces. He has conducted fieldwork over the last decade on contemporary commerce in two historic Istanbul marketplaces ––the Grand Bazaar and Istiklal Street–– and his current multi-sited field research explores the traffic in gold between Europe and the Middle East. Trained in social anthropology at the University of Sydney and Princeton University, he has held prior appointments as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Musée du Quai Branly–Jacques Chirac and as Andrew W Mellon Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"Unpacking the Ageing-Migration Nexus"

Keynote Lecture
  • Date: Oct 23, 2018
  • Time: 10:00 - 11:15
  • Speaker: Russell King (University of Sussex)
  • Russell King is Professor of Geography at the University of Sussex, where he founded and directed the Sussex Centre for Migration Research. During 2012-13 he was Willy Brandt Guest Professor in Migration Studies at Malmö University. He has long-standing and wide- ranging research interests in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies, including theorizing migration in its various forms, and empirical studies on labour migration, international retirement migration, student migration, return migration, diasporas, and the relationship between migration and development. Most of his field research has been carried out in Southern Europe and the Balkans. Amongst his recent books have been Counter- Diaspora: The Greek Second Generation Returns ‘Home’ (Harvard University Press, 2015, joint with Anastasia Christou), Remittances, Gender and Development (I.B. Tauris, 2011, joint with Julie Vullnetari), and Out of Albania (Berghahn, 2008, joint with Nicola Mai). From 2000 to 2013 he was the editor of the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Ageing and Mobility: Care, Generations, and Citizenship beyond the Views of the West"

Keynote Lecture
  • Date: Oct 23, 2018
  • Time: 14:00 - 15:15
  • Speaker: Sarah Lamb (Brandeis University)
  • Sarah Lamb is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Her research focuses on ageing, gender, families, ethical strivings, and understandings of personhood in India and the United States. Her books include: White Saris and Sweet Mangoes: Aging, Gender and Body in North India; Aging and the Indian Diaspora: Cosmopolitan Families in India and Abroad; and (as editor) Successful Aging as a Contemporary Obsession: Global Perspectives. She is the editor of the Rutgers University Press book series Global Perspectives on Aging.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 11, Göttingen
  • Room: Library Hall

"Data management in anthropology: the next phase in ethics governance?"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Nov 12, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Peter Pels (Leiden University)
  • Peter Pels (1958) is Professor in the Sociology and Anthropology of Africa at the Department of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology of the University of Leiden since 2003. He graduated in social anthropology at the University of Amsterdam on a study of Catholicism in East Africa (1993), and worked there at the Research Centre Religion and Society between 1995 and 2003. He published on religion and politics under colonialism, the history of anthropology, the anthropology of magic, social science ethics, visual and material culture, archaeology and science fiction. He was the editor-in-chief of Social Anthropology/Anthropologie sociale, the journal of the European Association of Social Anthropologists, from 2003 until 2007. Between 2006 and 2015 he was an advisor to the Çatalhöyük Research Project led by Stanford archaeologist Ian Hodder. He is currently interested in questions of race, culture and decolonization as they pertain to museums and heritage.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"(Mis)trust, (un)certainty and intention: can one trust an inscrutable God?"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Nov 19, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Matthew Carey (Copenhagen University)
  • Matthew Carey is assistant professor in anhropology at Copenhagen University, and his main thrust of research revolves around Tachelhit-Berber speaking communities in Southern Morocco. His PhD at the University of Cambridge focused on questions of political organisation, institutionality and anarchism, and his postdoctoral research explored subjectivity, intimacy and emotions in the Moroccan High Atlas. His recent work has focused on mistrust and lying (Mistrust. An Ethnographic Theory, University of Chicago Press, 2017).
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room

"The God of American bureaucracy: religion and the rise of the corporation in the Philippines"

Religious Diversity Colloquium Winter 2018/19
  • Date: Nov 26, 2018
  • Time: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Speaker: Scott MacLochlainn (MPI-MMG)
  • Scott MacLochlainn is a sociocultural anthropologist, with a geographic focus on the Philippines and the United States. His research examines the contemporary and historical intersections of religion and law, and the semiotic translation of religious identities across linguistic, economic, and regulatory domains. In particular, his work focuses on the history and expansion of corporations and their religious and ethical identities. Since July 2018 he is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at MPI-MMG, where be began a new project on the hyper-mediatization and increasingly fraught legal and social spaces of death in the Philippines.
  • Location: MPI-MMG, Hermann-Föge-Weg 12, Göttingen
  • Room: Conference Room
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