News

News

Appointment / Career

2022

  • Irfan Ahmad | Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Sociology at Ibn Haldun University, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Xiaoxuan  Wang | Assistant Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Sakura Yamamura | Associate professor at the RWTH Aachen University

2021

  • Felix Bender | Postdoc research fellow at the RIPPLE (Research in Political Philosophy and Ethics Leuven) at the KU Leuven
  • Benjamin Boudou | Research fellow and scientific coordinator of the Leibniz Research Group “Transformations of Citizenship” hosted in the center Normative Orders at the Goethe University Frankfurt
  • Annalisa Butticci | Assistant Professor at the Georgetown University in the department of Theology and Religious Studies
  • Tzu-Lung Chiu | Postdoc researcher at the Research Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences Ministry of Science Technology Center for the Advancement of the Humanities / Social Sciences national Taiwan University
  • Lucas G. Drouhot | Assistant Professor of Sociology at Utrecht University
  • Arndt Emmerich | Postdoctoral Researcher at the Max Weber Institute for Sociology at the University of Heidelberg
  • Jiazhi Fengjiang | Assistant Professor at the University of Edinburgh in the School of Social and Political Science
  • Eijiro Hazama | Researcher and lecture at the School of Human Cultures, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Japan
  • Nicole Iturriaga | Assistant Professor at University of California, Irvine in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society
  • Jin-Heon Jung | Professor at National Institute for Unification Education, Korea
  • Christine Lang | Research fellow at the Institute of Geography and the Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies at the University of Osnabrueck
  • Samuel Lengen | Scientific Officer at the Innosuisse (Swiss Innovation Agency), Bern
  • Sabine Mohamed | Postdoctoral research associate at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the department of Anthropology
  • Dora SampaioAssistant Professor of Human Geography (Transnational Mobilities and Wellbeing) at Utrecht University
  • Samuel David Schmid | Researcher and lecturer at the Department of Political Science at the University of Lucerne, Switzerland
  • Yang Shen | Frieberg Post-Doctoral fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem,  Louis Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies
  • Magdalena Suerbaum | Researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Gender Studies (IZG) at the University of Bielefeld
  • Siqi Tu | Postdoctoral Fellow for Global Perspectives in Society at New York University Shanghai
  • Arpita Roy | Faculty member at the University of Michigan Science, Technology & Society
  • Patricia Ward | Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Center for Integration Studies, TU-Dresden
  • Jingyang YuConsultant at the emcra (Consulting company in the field of EU funding), Berlin

 

Book Publications

2022

  • Ahmad, Irfan & Kang, Jie 2022 (Eds.). The Nation Form in the Global Age. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Link
  • Iturriaga, Nicole 2022  Exhuming Violent Histories: Forensics, Memory, and Rewriting Spain’s Past. Columbia University Press. Link
  • Simone, AbdouMaliq 2022 The Surrounds--Urban Life within and beyond Capture. Duke University Press. Link

2021

  • Ahmad, Irfan. 2021 (Ed.). Anthropology and Ethnography are not equivalent. Berghahn. New York. Oxford. Link
  • Lisa Björkman. 2021 (Ed.). Bombay Brokers. Duke University Press. Link
  • Paul Bramadat, Mar Griera, Marian Burchardt, Julia Martinez-Ariño 2021 (Eds). Urban Religious Events: Public Spirituality in Contested Spaces. Bloomsbury. Link
  • Jayeel Cornelio, François Gauthier, Tuomas Martikainen, Linda Woodhead. 2021 (Eds.). Routledge International Handbook of Religion in Global Society. Link
  • Ran Hirschl 2021. City, State. Constitutionalism and the Megacity. Oxford University Press. Link
  • Hudson, Alexander. 2021. The veil of participation: Citizens and political parties in constitution-making processes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Link
  • Martínez-Ariño,  Julia. 2021. Urban Secularism: Negotiating Religious Diversity in Europe. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York. Link
  • Meyer, Birgitt & van der Veer, Peter. 2021 (Eds.). Refugees and religion: Ethnographic studies of global trajectories. Bloomsbury, London. Link
  • Seethaler-Wari, Shahd.; Chitchian, Somayeh.; Momić, Maja. 2021 (Eds.). Inhabiting displacement: Architecture and authorship. Birkhäuser, Basel. De Gruyter. Link 
  • Türkmen, Gülay. 2021. Under the Banner of Islam: Turks, Kurds, and the Limits of Religious Unity. Oxford University Press. Link
  • Weinbach, Christine. 2021. Systemtheoretische Geschlechtersoziologie: Bestand, Kritik, Perspektiven. Beltz Juventa, Weinheim. Link
  • Yang, Fenggang and White, Chris. 2021 (Eds.). Christian Social Activism and Rule of Law in Chinese Societies. Lehigh University Press. Link

 

Grants

The new guards: Re-bordering the Southeast Mediterranean in an age of migration

The new guards: Re-bordering the Southeast Mediterranean in an age of migration

Michalis Moutselos

The Max Planck research group, approved to begin in 2022, looks at how Cyprus, Greece and Malta have managed their transformation from countries of emigration to destination countries for migrants and asylum seekers; and their emergence as border states of an emerging EU migration and asylum regime. Scholars from the three countries and migration researchers from Europe will form a network and explore this rebordering of the Southeast Mediterranean in a series of workshops and international conferences.
Re-bordering gradually erodes the sovereignty of nation states and leads to clashes (but also cooperation) among European, national and local institutions. Relatedly, re-bordering is having profound consequences on public understandings of citizenship and nationhood in the three countries. The partner group will be led by MPI alumnus Michalis Moutselos and co-directed by MPI Director Steven Vertovec. It is a formal collaboration between the University of Cyprus and the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (MPI-MMG). It aims to provide a systematic theoretical and empirical account of re-bordering in this understudied area of the European Union.
 
REVENANT: On the post-imperial legacies and memories of the Habsburgs, Ottomans, and Romanovs
Jeremy F. Walton
11 April 2022


From 2016 to 2022, the Max Planck Research Group “Empires of Memory: The Cultural Politics of Historicity in Former Habsburg and Ottoman Cities” examined the textures, silences, and contradictions that shape the afterlives of empires in central Europe, the Balkans, Anatolia, and the Levant. Our research focused on eight cities—Belgrade, Budapest, Istanbul, Sarajevo, Thessaloniki, Trieste, Vienna, and Zagreb—but our explorations were wider in scope and ambition. We reflected on the traces of imperial legacies inscribed on tombstones and memorials. We interrogated the summoning of imperial precedents to whitewashed, majoritarian images of nations and states in the present. We delineated the persistence of imperial social, political and institutional formations in the present, ranging from ideologies of religious and ethnic difference to charitable institutions. We tasted imperial pasts in Viennese-style cafés and cafeterias specializing in “Ottoman” cuisine.
In tandem with the completion of Empires of Memory, a new research group, “REVENANT-Revivals of Empire: Nostalgia, Amnesia, Tribulation,” recently began its activities at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Rijeka, Croatia, with the support of a European Research Council Consolidator Grant (#10100290). Like Empires of Memory, REVENANT was designed by group leader Dr. Jeremy F. Walton. REVENANT is a continuation, an expansion, and a refinement of Empires of Memory. In addition to the Habsburg and Ottoman Empires, REVENANT also encompasses the legacies and collective memories of the Romanov Empire. Accordingly, REVENANT entails a more direct focus on post-imperial renderings of inter-imperial dynamics: the ways in which relations between former empires continue to impact the present.
A threefold heuristic informs REVENANT’s methodology: post-imperial persons, post-imperial places, and post-imperial things. Bygone empires as objects of memory achieve personification through former rulers (Emperor Franz Josef; Süleyman the Magnificent; Tsar Peter the Great), imperial consorts (Sissi; Hürrem Sultan; Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna), and rebels (Gavrilo Princip; Atatürk; Lenin). The logics and textures of former empires differ according to place and scale—former imperial centers, erstwhile imperial port cities, and the borderlands of bygone empires each preserve distinct legacies and incubate contrasting memories. Finally, different categories of things constitute imperial pasts—our focus will be on post-imperial relics, post-imperial commodities, and post-imperial memorials. A broader discussion of this post-imperial, inter-imperial methodology can be found in “Post-Empire,”  Dr. Walton’s recent Working Paper for the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity.
REVENANT will conduct its research over a five-year span. In addition to Dr. Walton, it will employ four post-doctoral and four doctoral fellows. Like Empires of Memory, REVENANT is adamantly interdisciplinary, and will incorporate insights from Anthropology, Art and Architectural History, Comparative Literature, History, Memory Studies, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies. Our geographic remit includes no less than nine post-imperial nation-states, including Austria, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, Georgia, Greece, Romania, Russia, and Ukraine. Please visit us in Rijeka if and when you are able. more
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